I don’t know what to call this pattern, but I like it!

Image 1: “The Maze” by Debralee Wiseberg (link and another gallery)… I think it’s corroded metal?

Image 2: 2,2-(Bipyridine)(Naphthalene)-fusion melt (25x)

Herb Comess. Honorable Mention, 1994 Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition (link)

XXLux 

by Barbara Doser and Hofstetter Kurt, 2006

medien.KUNSTLABORKunsthaus Graz

Caption:

A screening of ecstatic moments created with the Video Feedback technique at the event horizon of perceptible worlds of image and sound while generating a moving picture. Moments distilled from experimental videos and compiled into a new unit.

Video Feedback is mapping (imaging) any visual event (image) to itself through parallelism and circulation. A minimum change of its instrument positions (video camera | screen) generate a maximum of stimuli at the time-based event horizon of perception. A flood of rapidly changing abstract images on the move will be experienced as a world of spatial complexity and of dynamic states.”

Source: http://www.sunpendulum.at/parallelmedia/time-no-time-01/xxlux.html

Background info on optical feedback

Volvox globator, a colonial green algae (more info at Wikipedia)

The vast majority of these illustration plates are from a plant systematics wall chart series – the Dodel-Port Atlas – released between 1878 & 1883”

via: http://bibliodyssey.blogspot.com/2012/12/plant-anatomy-charts.html

Volvox, a colonial green algae

From Wikipedia

“Volvox is the most developed in a series of genera that form spherical colonies.[1] Each mature Volvox colony is composed of numerous flagellate cells similar to Chlamydomonas, up to 50,000 in total,[2] and embedded in the surface of a hollow sphere or coenobium containing an extracellular matrix[2] made of a gelatinous glycoprotein.[3] The cells swim in a coordinated fashion, with distinct anterior and posterior poles. The cells have eyespots, more developed near the anterior, which enable the colony to swim towards light. The individual algae in some species are interconnected by thin strands of cytoplasm, called protoplasmates.[4] They are known to demonstrate some individuality and working for the good of their colony, acting like one multicellular organism.”

Image 1Volvox aureus, by Dennis Kunkel (2002): http://www.denniskunkel.com/index.php?module=search&pId=100&keyword=volvox&phrase=1

Image 2: From Wikipedia, by Frank Fox (www.mikro-foto.de); cc-by-sa

Image 3: From Wikipedia, cc-by-sa

Image 4: Life cycle of Volvox carteri: http://www.metamicrobe.com/volvox/