This was actually one of my favorite books as a child! I’ll have to scan some pages next time I visit my parents. I had pet planaria, tadpoles, caterpillars, a xystodesmid millipede, a dusky salamander… not all in a jar, of course!

(img source, although I don’t agree with their review!)

Eggs of Things, Maxine W. Kumin and Anne Sexton (1963)

Full (out-of-print) book available at brain pickings:
http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2013/04/15/eggs-of-things-anne-sexton-childrens-book/

Eggs of Things was followed by More Eggs of Things in 1964, also sadly out-of-print but available in some public libraries.”

“What I am trying to do. As a conscious means of hopefully competent participation by humanity in its own evolutionary trending while employing only the unique advantages inhering exclusively to the individual who takes and maintains the economic initiative in the face of the formidable physical capital and credit advantages of the massive corporations and political states I seek through comprehensively anticipatory design science and its reduction to physical practice to reform the environment instead of trying to reform man also intend thereby to accomplish prototyped capabilities of doing more with less whereby in turn the wealth-regenerating prospects of such design-science augmentations will induce their spontaneous and economically successful production by world-around industrialization’s managers all of which chain reaction-provoking events will both permit and induce all humanity to realize full lasting economic and physical success plus enjoyment of all the Earth without one individual interfering with or being advantaged at the expense of another.”

[whew]

— Buckminster Fuller, Earth Inc. (1973)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckminster_Fuller

http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Buckminster_Fuller

Monocot root cross-section

The vast majority of these illustration plates are from a plant systematics wall chart series – the Dodel-Port Atlas – released between 1878 & 1883”

via: http://bibliodyssey.blogspot.com/2012/12/plant-anatomy-charts.html

Prothallium (prothallus) — the gametophyte of the wood fern genus Aspidium

Aspidium is an obsolete taxonomic group from the family Dryopteridaceae, with its species now reclassified among other genera including Tectaria (Tectariaceae)

The vast majority of these illustration plates are from a plant systematics wall chart series – the Dodel-Port Atlas – released between 1878 & 1883”

via: http://bibliodyssey.blogspot.com/2012/12/plant-anatomy-charts.html

Cosmarium botrytis, a freshwater alga

More info: http://www.algaebase.org/search/species/detail/?species_id=28326

The vast majority of these illustration plates are from a plant systematics wall chart series – the Dodel-Port Atlas – released between 1878 & 1883”

via: http://bibliodyssey.blogspot.com/2012/12/plant-anatomy-charts.html

Cork cross-section

The vast majority of these illustration plates are from a plant systematics wall chart series – the Dodel-Port Atlas – released between 1878 & 1883”

via: http://bibliodyssey.blogspot.com/2012/12/plant-anatomy-charts.html

(hope none of y’all have that fear-of-many-tiny-holes thing, ‘cause this is awesome)

Volvox globator, a colonial green algae (more info at Wikipedia)

The vast majority of these illustration plates are from a plant systematics wall chart series – the Dodel-Port Atlas – released between 1878 & 1883”

via: http://bibliodyssey.blogspot.com/2012/12/plant-anatomy-charts.html

Buckminster Fuller, Laminar Geodesic Dome, United States Patent Office no. 3,203,144, from the portfolio Inventions: Twelve Around One, 1981; screen print in white ink on clear polyester film; 76.2 cm x 101.6 cm; Collection SFMOMA, gift of Chuck and Elizabeth Byrne; © The Estate of R. Buckminster Fuller, All Rights reserved; image courtesy SFMOMA.

via: http://arttattler.com/architecturebuckminsterfuller.html

a | This is a painting by John Piper that was used as the frontispiece for Waddington’s book Organisers and Genes. In the picture, which is intended to represent the epigenetic landscape, the developmental pathways that could be taken by each cell of the embryo are metaphorically represented by the path taken by water as it flows down the valleys. The water is supposed to be flowing away from the viewer, towards the sea in the distance. But the bifurcations of the valleys look so unnatural that the flow of water actually appears to be towards the viewer. b | A later depiction of the epigenetic landscape. The ball represents a cell, and the bifurcating system of valleys represents the ‘chreodes’ or bundles of trajectories in state space. c | A rare view behind the scenes of Waddington’s landscape. Each valley in the landscape is formed by tension on guy ropes that are attached to complexes of ‘genes’, represented as pegs stuck in the ground. Panel a reproduced with permission from the frontispiece of Ref. 12 © (1940) Cambridge University Press; panels b,c reproduced with permission from Ref. 13© (1957) Geo Allen & Unwin.”
http://www.nature.com/nrg/journal/v3/n11/fig_tab/nrg933_F3.html

*the permissions quoted above refer to the Nature article, not this post