Pygites brachiopods… or bizarre fossil scrotal phylogeny?

Images 1 and 2: Source. In German. 

Image 3: Source

Caption: “Pygites is unusual for a Terebratulid brachiopod. It shares many of the same features that other brachiopods in it’s order except that it has a hole in the middle of it. The hole is created as the shell grows and splits into lobes that then eventually meet back together and enclose a hollow area. This is odd behavior for a brachiopodand I’ve only seen a handful of genera that have even exaggerated lobes, such as Dicoelosia from the Haragan formation, let alone those that surround a hole. Below are three specimens from the Cretaceous (Hauterivian stage) of Spain that show you the variation in the genera.”

Image 4: ”Pygites diphyoides (d’Orbigny, 1849) from the Hauterivian (Lower Cretaceous) of Cehegin, Murcia, Spain. This terebratulid is characterized by a central perforation through its valves.” Source: Wikipedia; cc-by-sa

Image 5: Pygites diphyoides (source)

More brachiopods! The spiral lophophores are a filtering apparatus. 

Image 1: “Fig. 8. Hypothetical representation of efficiency of the filtering system of some extinct spire-bearing brachiopods showing flow patterns and extension of area for trapping food resources. Inhalant and exhalant currents according toVogel (1975) and diagram modified from Ager and Riggs (1964).”

Image 2: “Fig. 9. Hypothetical representation of efficiency of the filtering system present in extinct productid brachiopods showing flow patterns and extension of area for trapping food resources. Inhalant and exhalant currents as in a similar model proposed for Falafer Grant (1972) and diagram modified from Brunton et al. (2000) without including his interpretations.”

Source: 

Pérez-Huerta and Sheldon. 2006. “Pennsylvanian sea level cycles, nutrient availability and brachiopod paleoecology.” Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology. Volume 230, Issues 3–4, 30 January 2006, Pages 264–279. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.palaeo.2005.07.020

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031018205004451

More brachiopods! The spiral lophophores are a filtering apparatus. 

Image 1: Brachiopod, (image source)

Image 2: Magellania, an articulate brachiopod (source)

Image 3: Group of brachiopods. (Source). The coolest one is “E”:

Notosaria nigricans E. Brachial interior with spirolophous lophophore 


SPIROLOPHOUS LOPHOPHORE”!!!

Sounds like we have a word (or phrase) of the day!

More brachiopods! The spiral lophophores are a filtering apparatus. 

Image 1: Liospiriferina rostrata (jr synonym Spiriferina rostrata) (Brachiopod). Brachiopods filtered plankton, using a specialized organ: the lophophore. It is exceptional to be able to find silicified skeleton of this organ, visible in this specimen.” via Wikipedia (image source) cc-by-sa

Image 2: Spiriferina brachiopod fossil. Science Photo Library