shawnkthompson:

Following a head injury, Jason Padget developed extraordinary mathematical skills and a weird form of synesthesia that allows him to see the fractal reality.

According to the artist’s profile, 

“All are HAND DRAWN using only a pencil, ruler and compass.”

http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/jason-padgett.html?page=1

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2012/04/27/real-beautiful-mind-accidental-genius-draws-complex-math-formulas-photos/

After being kicked in the head repeatedly during a mugging:

A scan of Padgett’s brain showed damage that was forcing his brain to overcompensate in certain areas that most people don’t have access to, Brogaard explained. The result was Padgett was now an acquired savant, meaning brilliant in a specific area.”

fathom-the-universe:

Exotic Fractals

 

These images look like exotic phyto-plankton, but in fact they are boundary of different Julia sets.  Julia sets are mathematical fractals. The same pattern repeats infinitely in smaller and smaller detail. Following the same simple rules repeatedly, these amazing patterns are formed.

Fathom the Universe

Source and image credit: http://www.ijon.de/mathe/julia/some_julia_sets_1_en.html

 

Dude! That top one totally looks like a dendrimer! Will post more about dendrimers soon…

XXLux 

by Barbara Doser and Hofstetter Kurt, 2006

medien.KUNSTLABORKunsthaus Graz

Caption:

A screening of ecstatic moments created with the Video Feedback technique at the event horizon of perceptible worlds of image and sound while generating a moving picture. Moments distilled from experimental videos and compiled into a new unit.

Video Feedback is mapping (imaging) any visual event (image) to itself through parallelism and circulation. A minimum change of its instrument positions (video camera | screen) generate a maximum of stimuli at the time-based event horizon of perception. A flood of rapidly changing abstract images on the move will be experienced as a world of spatial complexity and of dynamic states.”

Source: http://www.sunpendulum.at/parallelmedia/time-no-time-01/xxlux.html

Background info on optical feedback

“Kaleidoscope feedback,” Peter from Xinaesthetic, 2009

Caption: “I’ve been playing around a bit with doing video feedback through a kaleidoscope shader.

In these images, the ‘seed’ that is fed into the feedback is simply the plain black or white background of the window. There is a single rectangle rendered with the output of the previous frame as a texture, which is fed through a GLSL shader which inverts colour and applies a kaleidoscope effect, resulting in rich chaotic imagery.”

http://www.xinaesthetic.net/2009/10/kaleidoscope-feedback/

order and chaos, grayscale, edge of chaos, feedback, generative art, algorithmic, fractal, square, dendritic

“What I am trying to do. As a conscious means of hopefully competent participation by humanity in its own evolutionary trending while employing only the unique advantages inhering exclusively to the individual who takes and maintains the economic initiative in the face of the formidable physical capital and credit advantages of the massive corporations and political states I seek through comprehensively anticipatory design science and its reduction to physical practice to reform the environment instead of trying to reform man also intend thereby to accomplish prototyped capabilities of doing more with less whereby in turn the wealth-regenerating prospects of such design-science augmentations will induce their spontaneous and economically successful production by world-around industrialization’s managers all of which chain reaction-provoking events will both permit and induce all humanity to realize full lasting economic and physical success plus enjoyment of all the Earth without one individual interfering with or being advantaged at the expense of another.”

[whew]

— Buckminster Fuller, Earth Inc. (1973)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckminster_Fuller

http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Buckminster_Fuller

Waltzing Volvox, from the Goldstein Lab at the University of Cambridge

Volvox is a colonial green algae (more info at Wikipedia)

Check out more movies on their YouTube channel and lab website

(And someone else has uploaded a more colorful video of dancing volvox here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9pjW1cMfTz8)

Buckminster Fuller, Laminar Geodesic Dome, United States Patent Office no. 3,203,144, from the portfolio Inventions: Twelve Around One, 1981; screen print in white ink on clear polyester film; 76.2 cm x 101.6 cm; Collection SFMOMA, gift of Chuck and Elizabeth Byrne; © The Estate of R. Buckminster Fuller, All Rights reserved; image courtesy SFMOMA.

via: http://arttattler.com/architecturebuckminsterfuller.html

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

In the image above we see two spheres of the same size, shape, and material being dropped into water. The left sphere has almost no splash, whereas the one on the right has a spectacular curtain-like splash. Why the big difference? It all comes down to the surface treatments. The glass sphere on the left is hydrophilic, but the right one has been treated to be hydrophobic. As a result, the water-fearing molecules of that sphere push the water away, allowing air to be entrained below the water’s surface instead. This creates a big splash that’s absent when the water moves smoothly around the hydrophilic sphere. (Photo credit: L. Bocquet et al.)

“Carol and Douglas Hofstadter in a mutual nose touching, forming a (metaphorical) “strange loop” in July of 1987 in the Wallowa Mountains in Eastern Oregon.”

Image credit: Peter Rimbey

Via: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1599720,00.html

(And I’m pretty sure it’s in I Am a Strange Looptoo.)

“Fingering instabilities in viscoelastic liquids”

Source: José Bico, with with Ryan Welsh & Gareth McKinley
http://web.mit.edu/nnf/people/jbico/Research.html

Oh my glob there’s a movie — this needs to be made into a gif

Interests include: “Experiments involving Interfacial Hydrodynamics, Wetting and Non-wetting, Complex fluids and general “Soft Matter”.” 

Recent experiments include: “Spreading flowers” “Gobbling droplets” “Dripping of a jelly liquid” “Fingering instabilities in viscoelastic liquids” “Wrinkling of elastic membranes” “Liquid trains in a tube”

Can’t tell if that’s from a faculty page… or OKC profile

“Siesta” by artist sam3: http://www.sam3.es/

Image 1: http://411posters.com/2013/05/siesta-by-sam3/

Image 2: http://www.streetartutopia.com/?p=6692

Image 3: http://411posters.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/SAM3-Siesta-Madrid.jpg

Via: http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2012/02/street-art-by-sam3/

Images 1-3 from Marshall et al. 2007. “Stomatopod eye structure and function: A review.” Arthropod Structure & Development. Volume 36, Issue 4, Pages 420–448. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.asd.2007.01.006 

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1467803907000126

Image 4 from Marshall et al. 1999. “Behavioural evidence for polarisation vision in stomatopods reveals a potential channel for communication.” Current Biology. Volume 9, Issue 14, Pages 755–758. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0960-9822(99)80336-4

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960982299803364