I seem to be a verb, an evolutionary process – an integral function of the universe.

Quote in context:

“I live on Earth at present, and I don’t know what I am. I know that I am not a category. I am not a thing — a noun. I seem to be a verb, an evolutionary process – an integral function of the universe.

Buckminster Fuller, I Seem to Be a Verb (1970)

http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Buckminster_Fuller

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckminster_Fuller

http://www.smbc-comics.com/?id=2833

I think *you’re* one of the good wobbles.

Joanna Macy, Mutual Causality in Buddhism and General Systems Theory: The Dharma of Living Systems (SUNY Press, 1991)
http://books.google.com/books/about/Mutual_Causality_in_Buddhism_and_General.html?id=APvFjc1VmW4C

Joanna Macy on systems theory/Buddhist philosophy/deep ecology (from her website, not this particular book):

“The greatest revolution of our time is in the way we see the world. The mechanistic paradigm underlying the Industrial Growth Society gives way to the realization that we belong to a living, self-organizing cosmos. General systems theory, emerging from the life sciences, brings fresh evidence to confirm ancient, indigenous teachings: the Earth is alive, mind is pervasive, all beings are our relations. This realization changes everything. It changes our perceptions of who we are and what we need, and how we can trustfully act together for a decent, noble future.”

http://www.joannamacy.net/livingsystems.html

You are the big bang, the original force of the universe, coming on as whoever you are.

It’s like you took a bottle of ink and you threw it at a wall. Smash! And all that ink spread. And in the middle, it’s dense, isn’t it? And as it gets out on the edge, the little droplets get finer and finer and make more complicated patterns, see? 

[…] If you think that you are only inside your skin, you define yourself as one very complicated little curlique, way out on the edge of that explosion. Way out in space, and way out in time.

Billions of years ago, you were a big bang, but now you’re a complicated human being. And then we cut ourselves off, and don’t feel that we’re still the big bang. But you are. […] You are still the process.    

You are the big bang, the original force of the universe, coming on as whoever you are.”

– Alan Watts, The Nature of Consciousness

http://deoxy.org/w_nature.htm

“Siesta” by artist sam3: http://www.sam3.es/

Image 1: http://411posters.com/2013/05/siesta-by-sam3/

Image 2: http://www.streetartutopia.com/?p=6692

Image 3: http://411posters.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/SAM3-Siesta-Madrid.jpg

Via: http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2012/02/street-art-by-sam3/

Know thyself

“All too willingly man sees himself as the centre of the universe, as something not belonging to the rest of nature but standing apart as a different and higher being. Many people cling to this error and remain deaf to the wisest command ever given by a sage, the famous “Know thyself” inscribed in the temple of Delphi.”

— Konrad Lorenz, On Aggression (1963)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Konrad_Lorenz
http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Konrad_Lorenz

You can read the chapter “On the Virtue of Scientific Humility” here

More on “Know thyself”: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Know_thyself

Through our eyes, the universe is perceiving itself. Through our ears, the universe is listening to its harmonies. We are the witnesses through which the universe becomes conscious of its glory, of its magnificence.

Attributed to Alan Watts, although it might be a paraphrase

The biologist George Wald once compared his work on an exceedingly specialized subject, the visual pigments of the eye, to ‘a very narrow window through which at a distance one can see only a crack of light. As one comes closer the view grows wider and wider, until finally through this same narrow window one is looking at the universe.

Rachel Carson, Silent Spring (1962)

Quote by George Wald, in context:

Years ago I used to worry about the degree to which I had specialized. Vision is limited enough, yet I was not really working on vision, for I hardly made contact with visual sensations, except as signals, nor with the nervous pathways, nor the structures of the eye, except the retina. Actually, my studies involved only the rods and cones of the retina, and in them only the visual pigments. A sadly limited peripheral business, fit for escapists. But it is as though this were a very narrow window through which at a distance one can see only a crack of light. As one comes closer the view grows wider and wider, until finally through this same narrow window one is looking at the universe.”

(Unsure of original source; quoted here)

What we observe is not nature itself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning.

Werner Heisenberg, Physics and Philosophy: The Revolution in Modern Science (1958) Lectures delivered at University of St. Andrews, Scotland, Winter 1955-56

 

Natural science does not simply describe and explain nature; it is part of the interplay between nature and ourselves.

Werner Heisenberg, Physics and Philosophy: The Revolution in Modern Science (1958) Lectures delivered at University of St. Andrews, Scotland, Winter 1955-56 

(Excerpt; summary)

http://abstrusegoose.com/215

Also available as a mini poster: http://www.cafepress.com/abstrusegoose.422398630

We are a way for the cosmos to know itself.

Quote in context: “Some part of our being knows this is where we came from. We long to return. And we can. Because the cosmos is also within us. We’re made of star-stuff. We are a way for the cosmos to know itself.”

—Carl Sagan, Cosmos: A Personal Voyage. Ep. 1: “The Shores of the Cosmic Ocean.” 

Quote autotuned: “A Glorious Dawn” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zSgiXGELjbc (Symphony of Science)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Sagan

http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Carl_Sagan